The Envirobiz Group
Providing Services Since 1983

EI Digest Annual Report Hazardous & Nonhazardous Waste Combustion
At Commercial Hazardous Waste Boilers & Industrial Furnaces
Years: 2000-2011

Principal Author:
Mr. Cary Perket has over 30 years experience in hazardous waste management. Mr. Perket background includes regulatory positions with State of Minnesota and Wisconsin hazardous waste programs, consultant to manufacturers on hazardous waste management, management of superfund and other remediation projects, and the permitting of waste management facilities. He has been involved with every EI Digest report since 1989.
Table of Contents
Confidentiality Agreement 2
Contact Information 2
Introductions 4
Executive Summary 5
Background 6
Hazardous Fuel Usage – 20119
Hazardous Fuel Usage 2011 vs. 201010
Hazardous & Nonhazardous Fuel Usage – 201111
Hazardous & Nonhazardous Waste Fuel Usage 2011 vs. 201012
Total Waste Fuel Usage Capacity Utilization 201113
Hazardous Waste Fuels Utilization 2000-201115
Nonhazardous Waste Fuels16
All Generator Shipments to Commercial BIFs17
All Generators Shipments vs. Very Large Generators Shipments to BIFs19
Very Large Generator Shipments to Commercial BIFs – 1999 vs. 200921
Analysts Comments23
Background

Commercial hazardous waste boilers and industrial furnaces ("BIFs") are located at manufacturing firms. The BIFs utilize hazardous waste fuels as an alternative to the traditional fuels (e.g. coal, fuel oil, natural gas) for their manufacturing process. The manufacturing processes produce aggregate, cement, or sulfuric acid. The primary reason that hazardous waste fuels has been and is currently used is that the hazardous waste fuels are a cost effective alternative to using the traditional fossil fuels.

Ongoing EI Digest research since 1989 indicates that at least 35 different commercial hazardous waste BIFs have used hazardous waste fuels. EI Digest's historical research records indicate that the maximum number of commercial hazardous waste BIFs that were actively operating in any year was 31 in 1993. The majority of commercial hazardous waste BIFs has historically, and still are, cement plants. Various factors, including more stringent air emissions controls and inadequate amounts of hazardous waste fuels, caused individual commercial BIFs to cease accepting hazardous wastes.

The BIF facilities, both historically and now, have more capability to use hazardous waste fuels than was available. Even so, our research determined that commercial BIFs have been the commercial combustion option receiving the most hazardous waste. During the early 1990s, about three times as much hazardous waste fuels were used as there was hazardous waste combusted at commercial hazardous waste incinerators.

In 2000, there was a capacity and need to use hazardous waste fuels beyond the amount that was available. In 2009, lower demand for aggregate and cement had reduced the need for hazardous waste fuels such that there was an excess of hazardous waste fuels. However, the capacity continues to exist to utilize more hazardous waste fuel when demand for aggregate and cement improves.

This report provides the 2010 usage of hazardous waste fuels by the commercial hazardous waste BIFs in the United States. Thereafter it compares the 2010 hazardous waste fuel usage in comparison to 2009 and subsequently examines the fuel usage trends back to 2000. It provides an analysis of potential for the commercial BIFs to use additional hazardous waste fuels when demand for their products necessitates additional fuel usage. The report there after reviews biennial reporting from hazardous waste generators for purpose of providing some state level trends and background pertinent to the analysts' comments.

Answers to Twenty Basic Stakeholder Questions:

1. How much was the total demand for hazardous waste fuel at commercial hazardous waste BIFs in 2010?

2. How did the 2010 total demand for hazardous waste fuels at hazardous waste BIFs compare to 2009?

3. What was the maximum demand for hazardous waste fuels since 2001?

4. Has the overall demand for hazardous waste fuel at hazardous waste BIFs increased, remained the same, or increased since 2001?

5. What is the market share of hazardous waste fuel usage of each company?

6. What percent of the hazardous waste fuel market did each facility have in 2010? In 2009?

7. How did the change in hazardous waste fuel usage from 2010 to 2009 at each BIF compare to other BIFs?

8. How much total demand for nonhazardous waste combustion at hazardous waste BIFs was there in 2010?

9. How did 2010 nonhazardous waste usage for combustion at hazardous waste BIFs compare to the previous year?

10. What was the maximum nonhazardous waste usage at hazardous waste BIFs in the past 5 years? Since 2001?

11. Has the overall demand for nonhazardous waste combustion increased, remained the same, or decreased in the past 5 Years? Since 2001?

12. What is the estimated market share of nonhazardous waste combustion at BIFs for each company (by tons disposed)?

13. What percent market share did each facility have in 2010 and 2009 for nonhazardous waste usage at BIF facilities?

14. How much has the demand for total nonhazardous and hazardous waste combustion at BIF changed in 2005? 2001?

15. What percentage of the overall usage for hazardous and nonhazardous waste combustion did each company have in 2010?

16. What percentage of the overall usage for combined nonhazardous and hazardous waste combustion did each individual BIF have in 2010 and 2009?

17. How did each overall hazardous and nonhazardous company-wide usage changes compare to other companies?

18.How did each BIF's overall changes in hazardous and nonhazardous demand at each BIF compare to other BIFs?

19. How did the overall trends at commercial waste BIFs compared to those for commercial hazardous waste fuel usage in North America?

20. What is the anticipated future capacity of the BIFs to utilize waste fuels?

Terms & Conditions
This annual EI Digest report is sold conditioned upon the client and The Envirobiz Group entering into a service agreement. The service agreement requires the client keep the entire report confidential. The Envirobiz Group reserves the right to decline to enter into a service agreement for the purchase of this report with any entity or person.
Service Agreement
This is a confidential consulting report, subject to a confidentiality agreement between the customer and Environmental Information, a division of The Envirobiz Group. The agreement provides for the customer to maintain the confidentiality of this report with the same degree of protection that it uses to protect its own internal confidential documents. The agreement also specifies that the contents of this report are exclusively for use by the customer’s employees. The confidentiality agreement prohibits the sharing or release of any of the contents of this report to any individual, company, or organization other than the customer’s employees except specific content that Environmental Information releases into the public domain or data that becomes public knowledge through other legal sources.
Contact Information
For further information, contact The Envirobiz Group Inc. at:
Mr. Cary Perket
[email protected]
The Envirobiz Group
www.envirobiz.com
Phone: (858) 695-0050
Fax: (858) 695-0250
Scope of Envirobiz Services
8525 Arjons Drive, Suite H, San Diego, California 92126   •   Tel: 858-695-0050